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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone,

Hope you, families and loved ones are safe and sound in this coronavirus s**t storm!

So, my water pump is leaking - albeit very slowly - and I'd like capitalise on the good weather spell we're having to replace it ...

I'm a fairly competent DIYer, but I'm relatively new to Audi. Mine is a 2007 3.0 TDI Quattro coupe (CAPA engine?)

It's a very tight engine compartment, and I'm not sure I'll be able to get to the water pump without removing quite a few components.

I've taken a few pictures, your help is much appreciated!!

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In the picture above, what is this rotating thing? I took off the black plastic cover marked by the arrow - while the engine was off - but couldn't take it out as the black bridge thingy (??) is in the way. Is there a secial way to get it out completely?

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How is this bridge(??) removed? I've taken the top plastic cover in front of it and the air intake just to have a quick look. I just don't want to start taking things apart without knowing what it's involved.

My theory is: removing the bridge would give me access to the bloomin' water pump ??

Also, where on earth is the EGR?

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Thank you all, stay safe and keep well :)

Cheers,
R
 

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Hiya R mate thanks for the best wishes and same to you and yours!!! Some experts will surely come past soon ciao Simon
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Found a picture on another forum which shows part I was asking about in picture 1: (thankfully not my car :) )
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What is this thing arrow's pointing to?

Cheers,
R
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I suggest investing in a repair manual for your car. Going in half-informed and guessing every step of the way is a receipe for disaster.
I kind of agree and disagree. Repair manuals may not show you short cuts, tips or tricks, some of them can leave something (or a lot) to be desired, and they aren't cheap....also, takes out the fun factor out of it :)

I've always relied on advice / how to's from fellow enthusiasts on forums, youtube..etc, and IMHO, if I'm guessing every step of the way, I really shouldn't be tinckering with my car, and I should pay to have it done (challenges with that also).

Thanks,
R
 

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Suit yourself. Your car. Your car's repair manual only costs around US$35 direct from Audi. That US$35 is a 24 hour subscription to download as many Audi manuals for different models as you want. So, it can go a long way if you desire. You can learn the short cuts, tips and tricks after you know the direct way of doing things. If you're too cheap to spare that amount of money for guidance, I am afraid owning an Audi is not for you. When things break down, the price of parts may break your bank. If you intend to DIY that is a fine way of saving money and learning new things/skills. But, at the very least, invest in a repair manual and learn how the factory does it. Then, ask for tips or short-cuts from enthusiasts. That way, you narrow down certain procedures that can be performed in a short-cut manner.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Suit yourself. Your car. Your car's repair manual only costs around US$35 direct from Audi. That US$35 is a 24 hour subscription to download as many Audi manuals for different models as you want. So, it can go a long way if you desire. You can learn the short cuts, tips and tricks after you know the direct way of doing things. If you're too cheap to spare that amount of money for guidance, I am afraid owning an Audi is not for you. When things break down, the price of parts may break your bank. If you intend to DIY that is a fine way of saving money and learning new things/skills. But, at the very least, invest in a repair manual and learn how the factory does it. Then, ask for tips or short-cuts from enthusiasts. That way, you narrow down certain procedures that can be performed in a short-cut manner.
Whoa there buddy, calm down!
Calling people names and making assumptions is not cool, k??
I didn't know audi sold manuals, I only know of Haynes (not available for my car, as per previous post, on their website), and Bentley (load of cr*p from my previous experience).
Can you please share a link?
Ta,
R
 

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Not calling anybody names. Just being frank. Sorry for being blunt as I don't beat around the bush. Just trying to help out before you get yourself into trouble.

I only have the link to erWIN US site. This is where I paid to download the repair manual for my S5. But, they don't have info for the diesel engines that were equipped in Audi A5's sold in other markets like UK and EU.

I did a Google Search and found this site for other markets like UK and EU: erWin – Homepage not logged on

You'll have to create a free account first before they let you know the rates to access repair information and other interesting info about your particular car.

The nice thing with a free account is that you can do a search and see what info about your car you can get if you paid the subscription price. If you're not satisfied then you don't need to pay.

I found a UK online company that sells Audi PDF manuals. Here is the link: Audi A5 S5 RS5 & Coupe PDF Workshop Service & Repair Manual 2007 to 2017 - easymanuals.co.uk

They're quite inexpensive and all the leg work of downloading the pertinent info for you car is already done. It seems that the info is for the entire B8 A5 range so you'll have that wide range of info. Check it out.

Cheers!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Not calling anybody names. Just being frank. Sorry for being blunt as I don't beat around the bush. Just trying to help out before you get yourself into trouble.

I only have the link to erWIN US site. This is where I paid to download the repair manual for my S5. But, they don't have info for the diesel engines that were equipped in Audi A5's sold in other markets like UK and EU.

I did a Google Search and found this site for other markets like UK and EU: erWin – Homepage not logged on

You'll have to create a free account first before they let you know the rates to access repair information and other interesting info about your particular car.

The nice thing with a free account is that you can do a search and see what info about your car you can get if you paid the subscription price. If you're not satisfied then you don't need to pay.

I found a UK online company that sells Audi PDF manuals. Here is the link: Audi A5 S5 RS5 & Coupe PDF Workshop Service & Repair Manual 2007 to 2017 - easymanuals.co.uk

They're quite inexpensive and all the leg work of downloading the pertinent info for you car is already done. It seems that the info is for the entire B8 A5 range so you'll have that wide range of info. Check it out.

Cheers!
Apologies for not replying sooner, internet's been on the blink, just got back..
I really appreciate your concern and your honesty, and I'm very grateful for your help, I owe you a cold beverage (or several) of your choice if we ever meet up!!
I called a friend of mine in Germany, who in turn called a friend of his who's an Audi specialist. Long story short, removing the bridge is not necessary. The procedure is as simple as removing the intake manifold in the 3rd picture (part where text says where is the EGR valve in this jungle), which then gives you access to the water pump and surrounding bits.


I'll check out those links you sent, I'll defo get a manual going forward. Compared to my last car - E46 BMW - there isn't as much info available, and I've got quite a few bits of preventative maintainance to do to this girl.

Thanks again mate ??
Cheers,
R
 

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Discussion Starter #13
An update:

The water pump is in place FINALLY!
Got the Audi manual and when I got the parts on Thursday (I ordered front brake discs and pads, 2 front dampers as well as the water pump), I started Friday morning.

It's defo do-able as a DIY, with caveats... You HAVE to know what you're doing and what do when things go wrong!! You also have to have a decent tool set and be very patient.
The car fought me every step of the way, I kid you not. The team who designed that engine and decided to only leave 2 inches of space between it and the radiator support (and leave LOTS and LOTS of sharp, unfinished edges everywhere) should be publicly named and shamed, and banned from ever designing anything more complex than a potatoe peeler 🤕

To start off with, tools you're going to need:

Torx T50
Torx T60
Torx T30
Torx T10
Ratchet Spanner (+/- various extensions and a cheater bar to help with belt tensioner)
I didn't tighten bolts to spec as mine was rusted and I didn't trust it..
19 mm spanner
17 mm spanner
little picks for electrical connectors (I hate Audi's connectors BTW...)
rags and very colourful language optional :cool:

Make a strong cup of coffee and start.

I took off the plastic engine cover, then the trays under the engine, placed big tub under car

Unscrewed various T30 on intake manifold marked by red circles ( a couple not shown, one on upper right hand corner near yellow square, one left upper corner near blue circle) using Torx T30
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I also disconnected the big hose on the lower right hand side (not shown in this picture). Be careful there's an electrical connector that passes just below and into air flow meter (??) which is at between the big hose and the intake manifold, which I also disconnected as well


Next disconnect electrical connector shown next to blue arrow.
Next carefully free up plastic clips shown in yellow squares (there might be one more hidden)

Disconnect metal fuel lines shown in blue circles using 19mm spanner, middle one is 17 mm. Place rags around to catch any fuels pills.

Then, carefully and very slowly lift up and pull towards you the intake manifold, watch out for cables, lines, wires...etc

TBC in next comment
 

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Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
This is what it looks like with intake manifold out:

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Take out hose and connector marked by red arrows.
EDIT: I also took out the 4 torx T10 screws on that thing (I think it's a secondary pump??) and removed the cover which is attached to the top of the hose, you'll see why in a later post, needed all the space I could get)
You can see air flow meter (??) in the right lower hand corner - disconnected - looking filthy on the inside and covered in gunk :poop:
The plastic cover over the pulley was taken out also, it was difficult, needed lots of wriggling

Intake manifold had 2 - 3 mm worth of very sticky gunk in some places, not sure pictures can tell the real story:

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More in the next comment
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Next was the fun part....
Not sure if somebody's been in before me, or it was the rust, bad luckor all of the above, the 3 torx T30 screws on the water pump pulley were bu**ered!! with very limited space, I tried everything to get them off, I finally made a notch in them using my dremel and a cut-off wheel, then slowly and carefully loosened them with a straight screw driver bit.. took me almost 2 hours to do that!!

Next use your spanner with the torx T60 bit (red circle in picture below to give you some perspective, not easy to see what you're doing) and move it very slowly clockwise. Keep going until you're able to loosen the belt, might need a breaker bar or something...
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Ideally, get a new serpentine belt, as you're there anyways, and you don't want to do this again. Mine had only a couple of thousand miles on it, so I kept. Make sure to mark on the belt with a sharpie it's direction of rotation, if you put a used one back in the opposite way, it might disintigrate or something (according to the Audi manual)

Next, unscrewed the water pump pulley and took it out. It was in good shape so I kept it.

I would recommend before starting on the water pump screws, get the new one in front of you for visual reference as it's not easy to see some of them. Also have lots of lighting and a small mirri would be handy. Water pump came out easy, no signs of where the leak was coming from, threw it away..

TBC
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The screws on my water pump looked to be in decent shape so I reused them (manual says to replace them if they're aluminium as you can't torque them again, mine were steel, tested with a magnet).

At this stage my back was killing me and I decided to have a break, so I turned my attention to the intake manifold.
I started off trying with brake and parts cleaner, ran out very quickly. Next I tried a steam machine, hardly shifted the years of gunk in there, so I stole one of these from the kitchen:
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tied it with a metal wire, sprayed oven cleaner inside, agitated every 15 minutes or so, rinsed, then oven cleaner again....
3+ hours later ( I used dish soap for final stage), this is the result:
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TBC
 

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Glad you were able to get it done, Raigmoul! German cars are so well engineered that they've become very complex machines. When they work well, they're fantastic! But, when they break, they can be challenging to fix but certainly worth the DIY effort with the right tools and a lot of patience. Congrats!
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I let the manifold dry and went back to the water pump.
Oh, how could I forget!!
It took A LOT of fiddling to get the old water pump out, there was absolutely no room at all, so turned it around (vanes facing radiator), and squeezed / pryed it loose around the secondary pump (where I took out the small hose)

Dry and clean the mating surfaces (manual talk :-b), engine side was still a bit wet, tried several times...
Slowly it went, remember to put ALL those screws back in. I finger tightened them before using the ratchet in a criss cross manner. hand tightened as my torque wrench was rusted and I didn't have another.

put the water pump pulley back on with 3 new bolts, then 45 minutes of scratching my head, swearing and crying all at the same time, serpentine belt didn't want to go back in!!!

I finally figured out why, I needed to loosen the tensioner a lot more than I expected / was used to...it finally went in.
Rememebr before that to check all the pulleys, this is the time to change them while you're at it :)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
My hands and forearms were covered in bruises, cuts and grease, but the sun was out and it was pleaseantly warm, so mangaged tosneak a couple of beers during 🍺🍺 this marathon

Anyways, plastic housing for secondary pump (??) went back on, then small hose was attached. Filled the fluid reservoir with about 6 litres of orange coloured car beer :) in total
I slowly watched for signs of leaking...none!
Then put the platic cover for the pulley wich sits above the water pump, put everything back in reverse order.

Pay special attention to those small guage fuel pipes, make sure the flared ends are seated properly, otherwise they will leak (mine did first time 😋), don't over tighten them or they'll break.

Moment of truth, I switched the ignition on, she hesitated for what seemed like an eternity, then fired up after ~ 45 seconds of cranking, got an "check oil level" warning on the dash just before she started.

Long story short, had to get her up to temp (90 C), topped up fluid occaisonally to around 6 litres in total. SO far so good, she's going out tomorrow for a good run to check all's well. Wish me luck 🤞🤞

Cheers,
R
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Glad you were able to get it done, Raigmoul! German cars are so well engineered that they've become very complex machines. When they work well, they're fantastic! But, when they break, they can be challenging to fix but certainly worth the DIY effort with the right tools and a lot of patience. Congrats!
Cheers buddy, and thanks again :)
 
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