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Every year for the past 4 years I have had to replace my rotors on my 2013 A5 coupe because they warp. I am not harrd on my brakes. The pads show minimal wear. Each year both pads and rotors have been replaced with OEM parts. This year I was thinking about going to slotted and/or drilled rotors. Any thoughts or suggestions please.
 

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That's odd because I have a 2013 A5 bought new, and I'm still on the original rotors 7 years 82K miles later. I've switched over to Akebono brake pads about 20K miles ago because they're completely silent and dust free.

Perhaps you want to try a different make for the rotor and pads. Or whoever installed them isn't installing them and torquing them properly.

If you use slotted/drilled rotors the pads will get chewed up faster.
 

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If the brake rotors keep warping even after they are replaced, it means that the demands of your daily drive is generating too much heat for them to handle. Don't do drilled rotors. They can't be turned if they need to be resurfaced. Just do slotted. Also, if you can upgrade your brake calipers to those from an S5 or RS5, you can use larger diameter rotors which means they're more capable in dissipating heat.
 

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My two cents is that they are not warping but that vibration you feel on the brake pedal and steering wheel is caused by runout at the wheel hub. This then progresses to thickness variations at the disk face after a time.

Ask a mechanic if they can check the runout of the discs and hub flange. Something like this - How to Check a Hub for Runout

or


The results of this will tell you if the runout is coming from the hub flange (my guess it is after so many replacements).

I have needed to change both fronts on my 2008 A5. I run ceramic pads and while the dust is way better they seem much more sensitive to runout and were getting really shaky when the brakes were hot after 5 or 6,000kms. After the hub and bearing replacement, all gone now.

I have also needed to do this on a Toyota Tarago on one side, samething 5 to 6,000km then when hot it would get really shaky (with the exact same make / and series of brake pads), from then on it gets worse with time.

I have read curb strikes with the wheel and bearings over time provide this runout.
 

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Your in the US. If the runout is small in the US you can get shims to correct .006 and .003 at NAPA


Can't get them in Australia.
 

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Every year for the past 4 years I have had to replace my rotors on my 2013 A5 coupe because they warp. I am not harrd on my brakes. The pads show minimal wear. Each year both pads and rotors have been replaced with OEM parts. This year I was thinking about going to slotted and/or drilled rotors. Any thoughts or suggestions please.
Hello mate. Well in my opinion you dont have warped rotors, it can happen with extreme heat but 99 per cent of the cases are due to some out of tolerance parts then causing the vibration that you then feel thro the brakes as warping. Even track use does not generally warp rotors and they get the brakes up to crazy temperatures. IDUA gives you very good tips above. And there is also a long thread you can find on here on the subject too. Good luck!!
 

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As said, the reason is

User error (heavy or prolonged braking or not bed in properly)
Cheap parts
Not fitted correctly.
Contaminated pad or disc surface (Most common and not actual warping)

Some pads can leave a glaze or deposits on the disc even during normal road use, but generally it is excess or sudden heat that can leave the deposits.

Slotted or grooved rotors will clean and de-gas the pad at high temps, reducing surface deposits.

Only sure way to tell if the disc is actually warped, it to check it on a machine.

One little tip to clean the disc and pad is hose the discs with water and leave until they get a rusty residue. It will get a rusty residue very quickly! Then go for a drive pressing the brakes lightly. Admittedly this might not do a lot and may need repeating due to the rust being very light.

Or go for a drive get the discs up to temp so they are not cold, then do some heavy repeated braking. Then continue to drive to cool the discs. If you park whilst they are hot, it will create hot spots especially where the pads are positioned when parked. Check out rotors from cars that have been on the track, besides the blueing from heat, they will be a 'matt' dull steel colour. Discs used on the road will be bright and shiney :)
 

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Blimey Dave that was a great explanation thanks!!! We need ya....
 
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