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I have an A5 2010 2.0
I've been noticing a strong smell of fuel after I've parked my car and exit. It's noticeable from outside the car. Not so much inside.
I mentioned it when I recently took my car in for servicing several unrelated items including getting an oil change.
The service guy told me that when he did the oil change he concluded that the fuel smell was caused by a faulty high pressure fuel pump. And that it needs to be replaced.
Is this plausible? I'm not sure how the high pressure fuel pump diagnosis can be made by observing something when doing an oil change. If someone could clarify that for me it would be appreciated. I just want to make sure before agreeing to perform the repair.
Thanks
 

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Get a second opinion. If the diagnosis is from a dealer, DEFINITELY get a second opinion from an indy mechanic. Dealers like to recommend the most expensive items to replace first. If that doesn't fix it, too bad, they've already overchraged you for unnecessary work.

It's possible it's the fuel pump, but it could also be something to do with the EVAP system.
 

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I have an A5 2010 2.0
I've been noticing a strong smell of fuel after I've parked my car and exit. It's noticeable from outside the car. Not so much inside.
I mentioned it when I recently took my car in for servicing several unrelated items including getting an oil change.
The service guy told me that when he did the oil change he concluded that the fuel smell was caused by a faulty high pressure fuel pump. And that it needs to be replaced.
Is this plausible? I'm not sure how the high pressure fuel pump diagnosis can be made by observing something when doing an oil change. If someone could clarify that for me it would be appreciated. I just want to make sure before agreeing to perform the repair.
Thanks
Why don't you pop the hood and smell the fuel pump if it's actually the problem? I'm pretty sure it'll be obvious when you smell it. Do you know where it is?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Get a second opinion. If the diagnosis is from a dealer, DEFINITELY get a second opinion from an indy mechanic. Dealers like to recommend the most expensive items to replace first. If that doesn't fix it, too bad, they've already overchraged you for unnecessary work.

It's possible it's the fuel pump, but it could also be something to do with the EVAP system.
I understand, I don't go to the dealer anymore and the place I took it to was an indy mechanic. SHould I still get a second opinion?

Why don't you pop the hood and smell the fuel pump if it's actually the problem? I'm pretty sure it'll be obvious when you smell it. Do you know where it is?
I could but I have no idea what I'm looking for or where to look.

Also from my limited knowledge, I know that the fuel tank is near the rear of the car close to the back seat and that is where the fuel pump is. Is that right? If so what does this fuel pump have to do with anything located under the hood of the vehicle? I mean how can you determine that the high pressure fuel pump is gone bad by doing an oil change which is located in an entirely different area?
 

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I understand, I don't go to the dealer anymore and the place I took it to was an indy mechanic. SHould I still get a second opinion?



I could but I have no idea what I'm looking for or where to look.

Also from my limited knowledge, I know that the fuel tank is near the rear of the car close to the back seat and that is where the fuel pump is. Is that right? If so what does this fuel pump have to do with anything located under the hood of the vehicle? I mean how can you determine that the high pressure fuel pump is gone bad by doing an oil change which is located in an entirely different area?
You can replace the fuel pump yourself easily. Here's a video of same exact 2.0 B8 engine, except its in an A4. But its exactly the same parts and everything.


Here's a picture of the high pressure fuel pump


Now pop your engine open, remove the cover, and give that sucker a nice deep sniff breath.
 

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I read your problem and I really want to suggest you that you should regularly service you car and do not take any risk regarding your life.

Henry Jurk
web design and development services in usa
 
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