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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Need some help please people

Monday sees me take delivery of a shiny new A5 3.0 TDI Quattro Sport Tip and I have a question. This will be a lease car and whilst I am sure I will look after it I have never been one for running in an engine!!!!

Do we still really have to take it easy for the first 300/500/1000 miles?

Or can i just stuff my foot into the floor and hold on from day one?

Today is Tuesday......6 days and counting

Advice welcome
 

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I would be gentle with it,why be rough? it may be more reliable and less likely to breakdown and leave you stranded somewhere.The first few hundred miles will soon pass:)
 

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Hey Hornet, welcome. There are several threads on this subject. Try using the search function.

The only point that seems to be agreed upon is not to use cruise control during the first 1000 miles. Otherwise there are basically two schools of thought. One that says keep the revs down for a certain number of miles etc and the other that says put the engine through it's full range from the off or as someone once said " drive it like you stole it ! " I went with the latter :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What did the guys who designed it say?

Thanks for replies but what did the guys who designed it say?

Surely engines are run in as part of the manufacture process now?
 

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Hi Hornet, I don't have the manual to hand but Audi, in common with most manufacturers, recommend what is on the face of it a sensible 'running in' regime.

The sheer scale of production means that engines can't be run up on the bench so the first time they're run in anger is generally when the car is driven off the line to the compound.

Although production tolerances are such these days that there is less of a requirement for components to bed-in, common wisdom (and said recommendations) says that for the first ~1000kms, drivers should avoid excessive revs (typically 4K+), avoid labouring the engine (i.e., use the gears liberally and as mentioned, avoid cruise for the same reason) and generally be conscious of fluid temperatures before working the powerplant hard.

That said, some of my fellow forumees take a different stance, namely that of 'rag it from the outset and show it who's boss' (otherwise known as 'drive it like you stole it'). The logic there is that over the long term, the engine will be more flexible and lose any early tightness sooner.

Personally, I took the middle route, driving sensibly in the early days as I got used to the vehicle but not being afraid to give it its head when the situation demanded.

At the end of the day, it' your car and it's up to you. But no-one's going to blame you (or bill you) for following the manufacurer's recommendations!
 

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I agree with Mr E. Keep it gentle for first 500 miles and gradually increase driving enjoyment untill 1000 miles. I did read somewhere to try to keep revs below 3000 thats about 120mph in 6th so running in need not be dull!!
 

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and on shutdown

The most important bit is to ALWAYS be easy on the engine until it is fully warmed up.
Apologies re sucking eggs, but if you have not had a turbo before it is also good practice if the motor is hot to leave it running for a minute or so at idle before turning it off. This circulates oil to cool the bearings. If it shuts down hot the oil can carbonise and foul the bearings over time.
 

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Apologies re sucking eggs, but if you have not had a turbo before it is also good practice if the motor is hot to leave it running for a minute or so at idle before turning it off. This circulates oil to cool the bearings. If it shuts down hot the oil can carbonise and foul the bearings over time.

Used to be the case ten years ago and was well founded. However, as most
modern turbo'd engines now run fully synthetic oil (which is ridiculously expensive), it is virtually impossible for this to happen as the oil is "engineered" specifically to avoid these issues. :)
 

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Careful or not

Used to be the case ten years ago and was well founded. However, as most
modern turbo'd engines now run fully synthetic oil (which is ridiculously expensive), it is virtually impossible for this to happen as the oil is "engineered" specifically to avoid these issues. :)
Strange then that the aircraft I fly and that also has a turbo diesel also requires a minute or so wait for the same reason. As it is my engine I prefer to look after it but can understand for a lease/company car - who cares - until the next owner gets it.
Everyone to his own.
 

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Strange then that the aircraft I fly and that also has a turbo diesel also requires a minute or so wait for the same reason. As it is my engine I prefer to look after it but can understand for a lease/company car - who cares - until the next owner gets it.
Everyone to his own.
OMG, here we go again!!! I am sick to death of trying to justify my posts to people like you. Please knock it off with the "it's not your car, so why should you care? " shit. You do what you want to do with your engine if it is something that you are concerned about. My point was that it is totally uneccessary with modern oils. The only reason for doing this was that the very high temperatures of turbo's were very capable of cooking the oil as it was usually mineral or vegetable based. If the oil overheated it could lead to blockage of the high-pressure oilways to the turbo and subsequent failure. As modern synthetic oils are able to withstand much higher temperatures for a much longer period, this is no longer the case. I have had two turbo diesel cars and one petrol turbo car in the last nine years, covering over 160,000 miles in them, I have never run them to cool them down and have returned them to the leasing company in excellent condition and running well. If this is what you want to do, then feel free but don't get personal with me for pointing out that it is not necessary. If it were, it would say so in the car's handbook.:knob:
 

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It is hard to rag a car with the Tip Box. Keep it steady until fully warm and drive in D until 500 miles. Then, mainly to vary engine revs more but also to increase the revs, drive in S for a few hundred miles. Then maybe play with the paddles a bit and ease toward the red-line gradually. At about 1500 miles drive as normal, whatever that happens to be for you.
 

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My point was that it is totally uneccessary with modern oils. The only reason for doing this was that the very high temperatures of turbo's were very capable of cooking the oil as it was usually mineral or vegetable based. If the oil overheated it could lead to blockage of the high-pressure oilways to the turbo and subsequent failure. As modern synthetic oils are able to withstand much higher temperatures for a much longer period, this is no longer the case.
I think, with these modern oils, it is not neccessary every time, but only after "hard drive", good example is stop at petrol station on highway.
We are talking about really high temperatures like 800 Celsius...
 
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