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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
MTM BREMBO 8 PISTON BRAKES ARRIVED YESTERDAY.

USE OEM AUDI R8 PADS.

CAR SCHEDULED FOR DEC 29. MERRY XMAS TO ME.

STASIS ECU AND EXHAUST UPGRADES TO COME.

MAYBE MY GIRLFRIEND WILL BUY ME THE SUPERCHARGER??


Mike was great to deal with at hoppenmotorsports.
http://www.hoppenmotorsport.com/Audi.S5.Tuning.htm
 

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8 pot?!?!
Wish our cars could go fast and hard enough to warrant that much braking power. :mad:
 

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Audi S5,
If you have a girlfriend that will buy you a turbocharger (supercharger) for your car SHE IS A KEEPER. Marry her asap!!
 

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8 pot?!?!
Wish our cars could go fast and hard enough to warrant that much braking power. :mad:
I never understood this argument; you can never have enough braking. No matter how fast you accelerated to a given speed, it's always beneficial to bring it back down faster, both in track and daily driver situations. Maybe even especially in daily driver situations -- if you are going 50 and someone cuts you off going 20, you'll be thankful for having the extra stopping power. I don't really see engine power as part of the equation here.

-Ray
 

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I never understood this argument; you can never have enough braking. No matter how fast you accelerated to a given speed, it's always beneficial to bring it back down faster, both in track and daily driver situations. Maybe even especially in daily driver situations -- if you are going 50 and someone cuts you off going 20, you'll be thankful for having the extra stopping power. I don't really see engine power as part of the equation here.

-Ray
I have to agree with this comment. You can never have enough braking.
 

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I never understood this argument; you can never have enough braking. No matter how fast you accelerated to a given speed, it's always beneficial to bring it back down faster, both in track and daily driver situations. Maybe even especially in daily driver situations -- if you are going 50 and someone cuts you off going 20, you'll be thankful for having the extra stopping power. I don't really see engine power as part of the equation here.

-Ray
Your rationale would conclude that using the handbrake would be best...
at a certain pt. your tires cannot apply enough traction to match the braking power u noob.

hahaha.
 

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I never understood this argument; you can never have enough braking. No matter how fast you accelerated to a given speed, it's always beneficial to bring it back down faster, both in track and daily driver situations. Maybe even especially in daily driver situations -- if you are going 50 and someone cuts you off going 20, you'll be thankful for having the extra stopping power. I don't really see engine power as part of the equation here.

-Ray
The number of pistons has very little to do with braking power anyway. The increased number of pistons or pressure points simply dissipates stopping power more linear across the pad surface extending pad life and and minimizing brake fade...
 

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The number of pistons has very little to do with braking power anyway. The increased number of pistons or pressure points simply dissipates stopping power more linear across the pad surface extending pad life and and minimizing brake fade...
ding ding ding we have a winner.

But the greater the surface area in contact the greater the friction thus the greater the braking power, given pressure is equal across all pistons.
 

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Your rationale would conclude that using the handbrake would be best...
at a certain pt. your tires cannot apply enough traction to match the braking power u noob.

hahaha.
How do you figure; the hand brake is basically operating a fairly weak drum shoe in the rear only, and doesn't have ABS to help stop it from locking up.

Regarding the tires:

A) anybody buying a big brake kit probably has better/bigger tires than stock.
B) you're assuming the stock brakes were already matched to the limits of the stock tires
C) even beyond the stopping power, you'd have better performance across repeated braking because of better heat dissipation

And are you serious with the 'noob' comment? I've owned, gone canyon running, and tracked 400+ rwhp cars which I built up myself (including doing big brake upgrades, for relevance sake). Anybody who has actually driven a car spiritedly before and after a big brake kit wouldn't be arguing with me and calling me a noob.

sizzle said:
The number of pistons has very little to do with braking power anyway. The increased number of pistons or pressure points simply dissipates stopping power more linear across the pad surface extending pad life and and minimizing brake fade...
Because I don't own an S5 with a bbk, I can't explain how much of a stopping power increase you actually get from the mod. But even assuming the difference is minimal, unless the car is very light, it's probably going to experience brake fade after one or maybe two hard stops. I haven't even tried this on an S5, but on an NSX, which has a similar floating-point caliper system but is almost 1000 lbs lighter than the S5, if you approached a hairpin at 90mph and brought it down quickly to 15 mph, your brakes are basically done for the next corner. Having multiple pistons and a bigger rotor is not a trivial gain if you intend to drive your car hard.

-Ray
 

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Cliff notes please noob.
heeeeee.
 

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Because I don't own an S5 with a bbk, I can't explain how much of a stopping power increase you actually get from the mod. But even assuming the difference is minimal, unless the car is very light, it's probably going to experience brake fade after one or maybe two hard stops. I haven't even tried this on an S5, but on an NSX, which has a similar floating-point caliper system but is almost 1000 lbs lighter than the S5, if you approached a hairpin at 90mph and brought it down quickly to 15 mph, your brakes are basically done for the next corner. Having multiple pistons and a bigger rotor is not a trivial gain if you intend to drive your car hard.

-Ray
Right, we don't disagree.

The stopping power is more the effect of the brakes not fading versus the pistons giving them more stopping force. So in effect, if you measure just the first stop of a 4,6, or 8 piece system, you would get very similar stopping distances. If you then measured each subsequent stop, the additional pistons would then show their value by retaining their power because of better clamping distribution and less fade....
 

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I never understood this argument; you can never have enough braking. No matter how fast you accelerated to a given speed, it's always beneficial to bring it back down faster, both in track and daily driver situations. Maybe even especially in daily driver situations -- if you are going 50 and someone cuts you off going 20, you'll be thankful for having the extra stopping power. I don't really see engine power as part of the equation here.

-Ray
+1

And on top of that they just look so much cooler behind the rims too...
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
MTM Brakes

Brake fade happens almost instantly with the oem Audi S5 brakes.

This is charted very well on stasis website, in a comparison to their (370 x 32mm rotors) alcon setup vs stock.

The brembo setup from MTM is 380mm x 34mm rotors. Also dimpled for track applications, better overall street perfomance, and less fade.

They chart a brake fade and stopping distance tests. This is a 6 pot alcon caliper. As you can guess what the results would be with the very best setup out their for the s5.

http://www.stasisengineering.com/sigSeries_s5.php
 

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Brake fade happens almost instantly with the oem Audi S5 brakes.

This is charted very well on stasis website, in a comparison to their (370 x 32mm rotors) alcon setup vs stock.

The brembo setup from MTM is 380mm x 34mm rotors. Also dimpled for track applications, better overall street perfomance, and less fade.

They chart a brake fade and stopping distance tests. This is a 6 pot alcon caliper. As you can guess what the results would be with the very best setup out their for the s5.

http://www.stasisengineering.com/sigSeries_s5.php
Don't knock the stock set-up. It's obviously not as good as as the Brembo or Stoptech upgrades, but put decent brake fluid in and they will stand up to track use. Braided brake lines and they are better still... all for under £100. Add pagid pads and they will stand even higher temperatures. Trust me, I've tracked the car and all I've done is changed the brake fluid. OK I'm an experienced track driver and know how to look after the brakes... and tracking is a far cry from racing.

Brake fade happens for three reasons, all temperature related and happen in the following order of increasing temperatures:

1) Plastic brake lines go 'soft' and expand, giving a soft pedal and long pedal travel

2) Brake fluid boils and forms bubbles, which are compressible, making the pedal so soft it will hit the floor.

3) Exceeding the operating temperature of the friction material in the pad. Where the brake feel and travel stays the same but the car doesn't slow down!

Upgrades help in the following way:

Larger diameter discs, provide greater stopping force, so when things heat up and there's less friction, the car still stops.

Drilled discs provide enhanced cooling so the brakes maintain better working tempratures by cooling faster when not braking.

Multi-piston calipers provide a more precise application of the pads on both sides of the disc and also greater force on the pads... this last one means that you can run lower friction high-temperature pads which resist fade, but still maintain good braking forces due to the extra force applied to the disc.

Floating discs are normally lighter than one-piece, as they can have alloy hubs and they resist warping due to the high temperatures, because as things expand and contract, excessive stresses are avoided because the disc can move relative to the hub under these conditions. this also means the 'ping' and 'tink' a lot when hot!

In summary, I will be upgrading at some point for performace and aesthetics. However, if you are on a budget and are unhappy with the brakes (which would surprise me) then fluid and brake lines is the way to go. No replacement pads appear to be available yet, but hopefully pagid and ebc etc are on the case!

...PS I love those MTM discs. Awesome!
 

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can you confirm whether or not the 19" stockers fit over these massive brakes without spacers?
 

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Can people also confirm how much this brake system costs and is it any better than the APS 'RS' brake system?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Mtm Brakes

Mike from Hoppen Motorsports and MTM both stated stock 19" wheels will fit with no spacers.

My car does not arrive until Dec-Jan, as I will post pics once installed.

I will be running stock 19" s5 wheels in winter with Dunlop Winter Sport 3D tires and 20" 7 spoke "RS4" style in summer with Michelin tires.

As far as cost, visit your local mtm dealer or hoppen motorsport website listed in first post.
 
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