Audi A5 Forum & Audi S5 Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
141 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I fitted some 20mm H&R DRA spacers a few weeks ago and it looks great. However, I noticed something while standing directly behind the car and looked at the rear wheels of the car (the 20mm spacers went on the rear), and it looks like the wheel is slightly "tucked" in. I thought it was just me so I asked a coworker to check it out too, and he also said it looks like the rear wheels are not sitting squarely on the ground. The wheels looked like /--\ instead of |--|. Is that normal? I thought spacers don't really affect the alignment and how the wheels sit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
198 Posts
No issues here.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
388 Posts
What you're describing with the vertical angle of the wheels is referred to as camber. The actual camber angle is not affected by spacers, and what you're probably noticing is the exaggerated stance from the wheels being pushed out.

There is a miniscule impact on camber from the slightly increased leverage put on the suspension from the spacers. The suspension is designed to add negative camber upon compression; since the spacers push the wheels out from the spindles, this additional width putsever so slightly more leverage, and thus compression, on the suspension, causing a slight lowering effect. But, at 20mm, we're really talking about splitting hairs here, and the effect you see on your car is, I think, an illusion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
I have been thinking about getting spacers, did you need or recommend longer bolts to compensate for the spacers?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
388 Posts
I have been thinking about getting spacers, did you need or recommend longer bolts to compensate for the spacers?
It depends. There are two types of spacers: those that bolt to the car's spindle/hub and the wheel bolts to the spacer, for which you do not need new bolts; and those where the bolts extend through the spacer to reach the car's spindle, for which you do need new bolts. The H&R Trak DRA are the former; the H&R Trak DR are the latter. H&R's 25mm and above are DRA and do not require new bolts, whereas 15mm and below are DR, and do. What about 20mm? These are available in both DRA and DR.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
There are two types of spacers: those that bolt to the car's spindle/hub and the wheel bolts to the spacer, for which you do not need new bolts; and those where the bolts extend through the spacer to reach the car's spindle, for which you do need new bolts. The H&R Trak DRA are the former; the H&R Trak DR are the latter. H&R's 25mm and above are DRA and do not require new bolts, whereas 15mm and below are DR, and do. What about 20mm? These are available in both DRA and DR.
Great explanation Europa - thanks. I'm installing 20mm on the front (25mm rear). For the front, are there any pros / cons on DRA vs DR other than any cost difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
No issues with spacers, but with lowering springs, apparently there is no camber adjustment available on the fronts.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
388 Posts
Great explanation Europa - thanks. I'm installing 20mm on the front (25mm rear). For the front, are there any pros / cons on DRA vs DR other than any cost difference?
The DRAs and DRs are pretty much equivalent from a performance standpoint. There are three drawbacks to DRs, as I see it:

  • - DRs require you to get another set of wheel bolts. The OEM bolts have a nice two-piece design where the actual ball that seats to the wheel is free-floating/spinning, which minimizes stress on the wheel and makes torquing-down more sure.
  • - DRs require longer wheel bolts, which will be slightly more prone to breakage than shorter wheel bolts (just like a longer length of rope is easier to snap than a shorter length of rope). I don't want to overstate this likelihood - it's definitely not a big risk and I've never seen a snapped bolt.
  • DRs are really annoying if you swap-out your wheels often, as I do with my snow set (a few times on/off this season so far). It's a fuss to align the wheel and the spacer on the hub. No, it's not a big problem, but it annoys me. LOL. On this reason alone, I wish I'd gone with DRAs. Plus, once you factor-in the cost of new bolts, they're pretty close cost-wise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
DRs are really annoying if you swap-out your wheels often, as I do with my snow set (a few times on/off this season so far). It's a fuss to align the wheel and the spacer on the hub.
There's a plastic wheel hangar that Audi provides in the tire change equipment - you can also buy aftermarket metal or even carbon-fiber - that will ease this burden... but yes, after having had cars with studs for years, using bolts is a real pain.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
It depends. There are two types of spacers: those that bolt to the car's spindle/hub and the wheel bolts to the spacer, for which you do not need new bolts; and those where the bolts extend through the spacer to reach the car's spindle, for which you do need new bolts. The H&R Trak DRA are the former; the H&R Trak DR are the latter. H&R's 25mm and above are DRA and do not require new bolts, whereas 15mm and below are DR, and do. What about 20mm? These are available in both DRA and DR.
Great! Thanks for the info! :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
82 Posts
Thanks!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
388 Posts
There's a plastic wheel hangar that Audi provides in the tire change equipment - you can also buy aftermarket metal or even carbon-fiber - that will ease this burden... but yes, after having had cars with studs for years, using bolts is a real pain.
You're absolutely right - I should be using a wheel hangar. That would solve the hassle for sure. It's very easy to snap the plastic version, but the metal version is stronger.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top