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I've just been told that you can now order DSG in the S5.

Anyone have much experiance with the DSG gearbox and how does it compare to the manual gearbox?

Additional cost is £1400 ($2800).
 

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Functionally, it's no different than a Tiptronic. That is, the way it operates from the driver's point of view is the same as any other shiftable automatic. Mechanically, it's far superior. It shifts quicker than any slushbox, and faster than any human can on a standard. It's got the efficiency and robustness of a standard, and the convenience of an automatic. Between the better mechanicals and the intelligent computer control, it ought to have the highest fuel economy of any transmission choice.

That said, I don't care for them, but only for the same reason I don't care for Tiptronic. Shifting by telling the computer to do it just isn't as satisfying as shifting in a way that moves the gears through your own effort. But that's just me. If I were inclined to get an automatic transmission, I'd hope it was DSG.
 

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I've already posted my positive experiences in the thread that Bryce has linked to. I love DSG but it's not quite perfect. To make sure there's a balanced view, here are some negatives:

- Sometimes you can confuse the DSG and it's very noticable. DSG preselects the next gear so if you want down when it thinks you're going to move up a notch things get a little jerky.

- I've had a few occassions where I've pulled out from a junction/onto a roundabout and there's no pickup i.e. the car just kind of coasts rather than accelerating away. This can be very scary and the only thing to do is change down and floor it which in an A3 can lead to the car skittering across the road (it's front wheel drive and very nose heavy and this sort of treatment almost sends it out of control). I suspect the initial delay is more down to the engine (turbo lag?) but DSG certainly compounds the problem. This is very rare but it's happened to me enough times over the last 3 years for me to know it's the way the car occassionally responds to my driving style rather than it being my incompetence.

- It's not possible to "redline" the engine on the A3: the DSG will always override you and change up a gear.

- I've found that my driving has become more "detatched", a little like playing a PS3 or something. Probably true of all autos but is this what people want from a full blooded sports coupe/GT like the S5? I hardly ever use the paddles and generally just slap it into sport mode when I want a bit more fun (although my brother tells me the manual for his new S-tronic TT says never to do this without stopping the car first which seems really dumb). I'm dreading a return to a manual gearbox in the next couple of weeks ... I'll guarantee that I'll bring a grin to a few jealous faces when I stall my A5 somewhere public.

There's a huge amount of comment on the pros and cons of DSG over on the Audi Sport forums, particularly for the A3 so if you're seriously considering DSG have a search around at http://www.audi-sport.net/vb/forumdisplay.php?f=44

P.S. At £1400 I think you may be being quoted for the new tiptronic option rather than DSG. They are very different technologies so make sure you know that you're getting DSG!
 

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DSG has been rumored to come tied with a 7 speed transmission.. if you put the S5 engine with a 7sp tranny and DSG, the results might fall just a hair away from perfection. Any R32 owner can relate to this, and from my own experience, DSG is pure fun, if you now how to use it.

On a A3 or a VW GTI, indeed you feel that you're 1 gear short of 100% fun, with 7 gears, pretty much you'll have the perfect gear for any situation, just remember to either tap the brake before down-shifting of step on the gas when up-shifting. If you don't touch any pedal and start to make gear changes, yes.. you'll confuse the computer, because it'll take a while to make the wrong decision.

Think of the lag like when you use a laptop with a celeron and a laptop with a Dual Core 2 Duo and 3gb of ram when DSG is properly working.

My take is that the S5 with 7sp DSG will be an absolute blast to drive. (and will be wife friendly)
 

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My take is that the S5 with 7sp DSG will be an absolute blast to drive. (and will be wife friendly)
Speak for your own wife. My wife will only drive manuals, and is generally annoyed by women (and men) who can't drive stick. Her last two cars have been convertibles (VW Cabrio and Eos), and since they're marketed more for women, getting a MT in each was tough.
 

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I test drove a couple A3's with DSG and it literally felt like a race car with the instantaneous shifts. In my opinion, the DSG felt best shifting near redline in lieu of mid rpm shifting. I still prefer the manual simply for the ability to coast prior to a downshift when the need arises. The DSG is very fun and you feel like it is a standard manual until you want to downshift smoothly. The instant engine braking effect when you downshift with DSG makes the transitions feel abrupt. Engine braking is a good thing for the track but in everyday driving I feel this abruptness could get tiring. Just my opinion though! DSG is attractive however since it can shift faster than manuals yet have convenience of a auto. I'm sure that will be attractive to many.
 

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Don't get me wrong...

I rather drive manual. My point is that I'm not opposed to rule out DSG because it "looks" like an automatic from time to time, and it'll require some driving adjustments, to get the most of it. Right now, being Tiptronic the only option, no contest.. no thank you. If DSG is available and i'm at a dealership and says.. 8 months wait for a manual vs this DSG that you can take home today... i'll give it a 2 minute though.
 

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Dsg

OPINION
I've driven 6-speed DSG in 3.2 Quattro A3 S-Line for 2 years (yes, I know - engine fab, gearbox excellent, suspension crap = bouncy-castle = :eek: )

DSG is excellent. It is not perfect but it's a hell of a lot better than a 'jerky' manual - TO LIVE WITH.

AUDI is going all-out in technology stakes and the S5 is to be equipped with 7-Spd DSG AND you can be sure they'll do their best to iron-out any imperfections.

Expect to pay £1,500 for DSG in UK.

More on AUDI website regarding S-Tronic, R-Tronic, Multitronic, Tiptronic and Gizmo-Tronics...........
 

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This is just my past experience for people to take it or leave it. A few years ago I found myself tired of driving a manual after about 20 years of driving them. Was in my mid 30's and decided to get a tiptronic S4. For the first 6 months to a year I totally loved it and it was a refreshing change in city traffic. But over time I slowly felt like the fun was missing and all it took was some spirited drives in my wife's manual Mini Cooper S to make me realize getting an automatic was a mistake.

I picked up my manual S5 3 weeks ago and I'm just in heaven -- driving has become fun again and I now know what I was missing the last 3 years. People will say though, "Tiptronic is not DSG... DSG is 10 times better", etc etc. It's NOT. I've driven the DSG and it's good. It is technically a perfect automatic but makes driving too easy and "detached" is the perfect word for it as someone above has said.

If you normally drive an automatic (tip or CVT) the DSG is a no brainer, and a great upgrade in technology. If you mostly drive a manual and have become tired in traffic and think maybe you want to cross over to an automatic -- give it serious thought. Many people regret it -- including me -- but some do not and never look back. You might be one of the former or the latter.

So while I'm not putting down the DSG technology, I'm confirming what others have said in that it takes out the connection with the engine that you can have.

One strange analogy I can think of is this: If you could use a magical golf club that you would just hold behind the ball and drive it 300 yards every time, or take that smooth slow backswing, follow through and drive the ball 300 yards yourself and drop it in the middle of the fairway... what would be more satisfying? When I'm rowing through the gears on country roads and freeways it just feels great to control the revs and choose the gear I want without trying to outsmart a computer.

Anyway, my 2 cents. The S5 is a great car either way. I'm just relaying my personal experience and opinion if it helps you.
 
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