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Sometimes i dont like to wear my seat belt, and I really hate the ding ding, .. anyone who has turned it off , id love the info.?/ Thanks
 

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sounds like a dangerous modification,
i mean to each his own, but come on, not driving without your seatbelt?
 

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In a car with an airbag, driving without a seatbelt is HIGHLY LIKELY to be lethal, even in a low speed (30 mph) incident. The airbag will break you neck... especially US ones which are larger. This is why by law, US cars must have seatbelt and weight sensors in the passenger side, to ensure the airbag is deplyed ONLY in the right situation... following several incidents where passengers heads were actually severed by the airbag in low speed collisions.

I think this is foolish and dangerous. I apologise if this does not answer your original question, but I really am concerned for your safety.
 

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An extract from Business Week here:

http://www.businessweek.com/autos/content/jan2006/bw20060103_767848.htm


7. Can airbags injure people? Yes. Occasionally, the energy required to inflate frontal airbags quickly can cause injury. Fortunately, most of these injuries are minor scrapes and abrasions. Serious injuries and deaths are relatively rare. Since 1990, deaths attributable to airbag inflation in low-speed crashes numbered more than 260 according to NHTSA. Approximately 65 percent of motorists killed by airbags have been passengers, and more than 90 percent of the passenger airbag fatalities have been children and infants, most of whom were unbelted or in rear-facing restraints that placed their heads close to the deploying airbag. Among the adult driver and passenger deaths, about three-quarters were women. More than 80 percent of those killed were unbelted or improperly restrained, and more than 90 percent of deaths occurred in vehicles manufactured before 1998.

In 1997, the federal government set rules allowing manufacturers to reduce the energy (or power levels) of frontal airbags. Indications are that newer airbag designs and efforts to educate motorists are reducing airbag-related injuries and deaths. The number of airbag deaths appears to be shrinking even as the number of airbag-equipped vehicles increases. A recent study found that children exposed to airbag deployments in 1998 and newer model cars and minivans were half as likely to sustain significant injury compared with children in pre-1998 cars and minivans.4 Another recent study concluded that 1998 and 1999 model passenger vehicles appear to be providing improved protection in frontal crashes compared with vehicles manufactured prior to 1998 with the exception of pickups, which had an increased risk. When pickups were excluded, there was an 11 percent decrease in driver fatality risk in frontal crashes among all other passenger vehicles combined.5

Like frontal airbags, side airbags have the potential to cause injury. However, side airbags typically are smaller and involve less deployment energy than frontal airbags. To date, there has been only one serious injury reportedly due to side airbag inflation. This involved an elderly male driver who suffered multiple rib fractures. His vehicle was equipped with door-mounted side airbags designed to protect the chest only.

8. Who has been injured? Anyone on top of or very close to a frontal airbag as it begins to inflate may be injured. Most deaths caused by frontal airbags involve people who were unbelted or improperly belted; about 62 percent were children. Unbelted occupants, especially passengers, are likely to move forward if there is hard braking or other violent maneuvers before a frontal crash. These occupants can end up on top of, or extremely close to, their airbags as they begin to inflate. Short and elderly drivers can be especially vulnerable to inflation injuries from frontal airbags because they tend to sit close to the steering wheel. Infants in rear facing restraints are at a very high risk, because the infants' heads are close to the deploying airbag.

9. What can be done to decrease injuries caused by airbags? The first step in preventing injuries from inflating airbags is to use a safety belt and maintain a proper seating position. Other important precautions include:
 

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Sometimes i dont like to wear my seat belt, and I really hate the ding ding, .. anyone who has turned it off , id love the info.?/ Thanks
Obviously u know its dangerous, are you looking for an early grave...in which case should that happen can I have your car :D
 

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you may not want it..

seriously, i understand the annoyance of the dings, but please don't drive in an unsafe manner..
 
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