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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thanks to houseofg for suggesting this posting.

Looking through the A5 owner's manual at the "Break In" suggestions, leaves most people a little confused over how to correctly start a relationship with a new car. Below you will find the method I have used for every new car I have owned. (My friends and some people who worked with, and for, me have often started a waiting list to purchase my used cars because of the way I treat them.)

The key words for your new acquisition are: vary your speed. You will find this in almost every owner's manual ever printed for automobiles and motorcycles. But, as usual, it seems like most manufacturers give the assignment of editing the OM to the least knowledgeable person in their employ. I believe more information is necessary.

First of all do not use your cruise control until after 1000 miles. That is my bible during this time. The next instruction is watch your speedometer. I like to start out on some deserted side street where traffic is light. You vary your speed from 20 to 30 or 25 to 35 mph. Do this for ten miles or so. (These speeds can change depending on traffic.) From there you increase your speeds in ten mph increments accelerating from the lowest to the highest speeds without braking. Let the engine decrease your speed. It would be easiest to find a road with the next highest speed limit that you are moving up to and go five mph slower to five mph faster than the speed limit.

I currently have 150 miles on my silver A5 and I am varying between 60 to 70 mph. Next I have to find a road that I can drive 65 to 75. The length of time between changes of speed varies because of traffic and the amount of patience you have.

One final suggestion: be courteous. That car behind you could be me and I am always in a hurry. Happy new car.

If I have confused you, please drop me a line and I will try to be more explicit.

Peace, harmony, love and laughter,
Quickag
 

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My $0.02

I've also followed the vary your speed rule with my new cars. In addition, I try to keep the RPM under 3000, and definitely under 4000 during the break-in, and also avoid really hard acceleration.
 

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Excellent - thanks for posting this, Quickag!

This will be a bit of a challenge for me (and is going to take forever unless I build in a couple road trips!) because my commute is all of a few miles...10 minutes on a 40 mph speed limit road. I know, I need to move further away from work! Damn the convenience!

What is your break in period? The 1k miles you referenced before using cruise control or something greater?

And what is your take on changing the oil? 1k, 5k, 10k? Does it make a difference that we are talking about high quality synthetic?

Yeah, JSC..that's the really tortuous part! And it makes knowing the break-in period that much more important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks JSC

Your $.02, I'm sure, was Canadian. (Worth more than ours.) But to me it was valued much more as I neglected to mention rpm.

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
A thousand mile "run in" is all I can stand.

I don't have a lot of patience. After picking up a Mercedes CLK in Germany a few years ago, I was doing my break-in dance on the Autobahn when a Porsche GT went flying past me. That was more than I could take. I mean how often do you get to drive over 200 kph?

I also have a Porsche Cayenne--hey, I do need to visit Home Depot every once and a while. When I took it to a dealer for an oil change at about 650 miles they refused, yes, they refused to change the oil. I was shocked because I always try to change the oil after the first 500 miles. I thought that there were tiny shavings in the cylinders when you first break in a car and you need to get rid of that garbage. Well I guess that with the new synthetics and the better finish on modern engines that an early oil change is unnecessary. I now wait until the message begs me to change the oil. But after the first change it is usually around 5000 miles.
 

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Oh well too late for me then....just out of interest why?
i think it's because the cruise control maintains the speed of the car within a narrow band and that's counter to what quickag is suggesting, which is to continuously vary the speed of the car...
 

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Piggy-backing on quickag again...

I don't have a lot of patience. After picking up a Mercedes CLK in Germany a few years ago, I was doing my break-in dance on the Autobahn when a Porsche GT went flying past me. That was more than I could take. I mean how often do you get to drive over 120 kph?
I don't have my A5 yet, but for my other Audis the manual has suggested 1600 km (1000 miles) as the break-in period.
 

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I also treat my cars very carefully, not only when running in, but over the whole lifetime.

Most manufacturers these days have little to say on running in an engine, and, truth be told, it is NOT as important as it used to be.

HOWEVER, there are some golden rules with ALL engines...

Certainly when new, it is wise to vary the speed. Keeping a constant engine speed can develop "lips" in the cylinders.

But THE most important thing in my opinion to get a long life out of an engine is to follow one golden rule...

Treat the accelerator gently until the oil temp is up to working temp.

NEVER accelerate hard on a cold engine. 95% of an engine's wear is done when the engine is cold. This is why on my last two Saabs I have had a parking heater. This not only makes it pleasant to get into a warm car on a cold morning, but also reduces the egine wear significantly.

I just hope I can get a parking heater fitted to my A5 here in the UK.

So remember...when running in...vary the speed...and for the whole life of the engine...NEVER accelerate hard until the oil is at working temp! If you obey these two simple rules...in my opinion...you won't go far wrong :)

I guess I am lucky in that I don't do many short journeys...so always get the chance to warm the engine up properly. Once the engine is at optimal temp, you can drive it as hard as you like without causing much damage (so long as you don't over-rev it!).

Just my opinion :)

Ronnie.
 

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I also treat my cars very carefully, not only when running in, but over the whole lifetime.

Most manufacturers these days have little to say on running in an engine, and, truth be told, it is NOT as important as it used to be.

HOWEVER, there are some golden rules with ALL engines...

Certainly when new, it is wise to vary the speed. Keeping a constant engine speed can develop "lips" in the cylinders.

But THE most important thing in my opinion to get a long life out of an engine is to follow one golden rule...

Treat the accelerator gently until the oil temp is up to working temp.

NEVER accelerate hard on a cold engine. 95% of an engine's wear is done when the engine is cold. This is why on my last two Saabs I have had a parking heater. This not only makes it pleasant to get into a warm car on a cold morning, but also reduces the egine wear significantly.

I just hope I can get a parking heater fitted to my A5 here in the UK.

So remember...when running in...vary the speed...and for the whole life of the engine...NEVER accelerate hard until the oil is at working temp! If you obey these two simple rules...in my opinion...you won't go far wrong :)

I guess I am lucky in that I don't do many short journeys...so always get the chance to warm the engine up properly. Once the engine is at optimal temp, you can drive it as hard as you like without causing much damage (so long as you don't over-rev it!).

Just my opinion :)

Ronnie.
Well if you find this parking heater for the car, let us know - i'd be interested in that.
 

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Well if you find this parking heater for the car, let us know - i'd be interested in that.
There has been some discussion of the parking heater here in the past. It doesn't really give a definitive answer, but it does at least show that they exist. Seems like it must be an option available in parts of Europe, anyway.
 

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Another perspective:

Speaking as an ex audi mechanic and ASE Master: Beat the snot out of it.

... or it won't stop burning oil, ever. Pretty simple.

I know this topic is often disputed, and frankly I don't give a shit because every one of my vehicles doesn't burn a drop at 100k miles so there's believers and there aren't.

You have a narrow window of opportunity to seat the rings, about a thousand miles. The engine must experience the entire wide range of RPM during this process. Extended drives are an absolute no, a drive across the country at 3000 rpm is the worst.

Search the forums. You'll find lots of "My car has a low oil light on at 2500 miles and it took 3 quarts to top it off, I never went above 5000 rpm for the first 2000 miles, what the hell is wrong??" ... yep. he was an idiot. It will burn that much forever.

So. Beat the snot out of it. Luckily the audi tech who did the PDI of your car already did that for the first 7 miles, if he did it per all of the steps including "test vehicles performance in all conditions" ... a lot of stuff burns off the exhaust at that point. We were instructed specifically to not baby it at all.

Leave the oil that's in it for 1k miles, and then change it using synthetic. Change it again at 5k.

Just my opinion. You'll hear many, I'm sure. Few are qualified to make one.
http://forums.audiworld.com/a5/msgs/29455.phtml
 

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In my home country, Saudi Arabia, people have this rule of warming up the car before moving, untill the temp. of the engine has heated up. Here in America, I don't see anyone doing it? how come? even though it's colder here than in Saudi!
 

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I posted this in another thread so ill just copy and paste here :D

I think both methods are correct depending on what you want from a car.

The "baby it" method described in manufacturers books will help the engine run smoothly, not leak oil etc.... Its good for engine longevity and making sure you have no problems - thats probably why manufacturers recommend this route, so they wont have you back to them complaining about engine faults !! Its not necessarily the best if you want to get the best out of your car in terms of performance though.

The "drive it like you stole it method" will help ensure your engine performes at it it optimum in terms of performance (bhp etc..) but can lead to slightly shorter engine life. Race drivers use this method as they need the car to perform as well as the engine possibly can and dont need to worry about the longevity of the engine as it will probably be replaced every few races anyway.

If you do a bit of searching on the internet you can find lots of things to back up this very basic explanation. Lots of people say vary the revs, never go over 4000rpm etc..., lots go the other route. Dont think either way is right or wrong - which method you use will depend on what you want from the car - performance or reliability
 

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