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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll be placing an order on a new A5 soon, but now I'm having second thoughts on the auto-box on the 3.0 TDi.

Only ever having had manual cars, I'm getting a bit fed up of the stick-shift. However, I test drove a Tiptronic box and wasn't sure I liked it as much as I thought I would!

Anyone who has gone from a manual to a Tiptronic box, what are your thoughts?
 

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Hi Suzy80.

I thought about Auto but the 3.0Tdi is such a flexible lump the manual is fine. If I were doing a lot of town stop start driving I would have had an auto but it probably wouldn't have been an A5.
 

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Auto vs. Manual is a debate that can rage for ages. A lot of it comes down to personal preference and what kind of driving you are doing.

I have the auto tiptronic 3.0TDI and the auto box is fantastic. Accelleration is smooth (no jerky starts or changes). The tiptronic is fine. As a manual driver I really wanted to have this feature but I find I rarely use it.

It is definately a different driving experience with the automatic. The feedback and control you get from clutch and manual is gone in auto. However, it's replaced with serious convenience - especially in traffic.

I find I get as much fun driving the auto as the manual minus the headache of constantly clutching in stop start traffic in London every day. But that is just my experience and as I say a lot of this is personal preference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, I didn't expect the "control" element to be as missing in the auto and I did miss it. That feeling of being able to control the car mm perfect just wasn't there. For the short while I had the Tiptronic, only played with the paddles once or twice, and then forgot about them. I was driving a 2 litre A6 diesel so I guess the experience will be a bit different to the 3 litre.

Decisions, decisions...
 

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Auto vs. Manual is a debate that can rage for ages. A lot of it comes down to personal preference and what kind of driving you are doing.

I have the auto tiptronic 3.0TDI and the auto box is fantastic. Accelleration is smooth (no jerky starts or changes). The tiptronic is fine. As a manual driver I really wanted to have this feature but I find I rarely use it.

It is definately a different driving experience with the automatic. The feedback and control you get from clutch and manual is gone in auto. However, it's replaced with serious convenience - especially in traffic.

I find I get as much fun driving the auto as the manual minus the headache of constantly clutching in stop start traffic in London every day. But that is just my experience and as I say a lot of this is personal preference.
+1 to all that ed03 says - switched from manual to auto cars 4 years ago and would be reluctant to go back to manual - convenience far outways loss of control for me.
 

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I had the 3.0 TDi with an auto box in my previous VW Touareg, and now the manual box in the A5 (the auto wasn't available when I purchased). As much as I agree with the statements about Autos being easier, I think the manual box on the A5 is actually a pretty good one. The clutch is relatively light, but also positive. The gearshift throw is not too long, not too heavy and finding the right gate is never an issue.

Having said that... I think big diesels suit autoboxes (tons of torque, so any loss in the torque-converter isn't an issue), so if I was buying again today, I'd probably choose the auto... Shame they don't offer the 3.0 TDi with the DSG / S-Tronic box. Best of both worlds...

Just my 2p.
 

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Shame they don't offer the 3.0 TDi with the DSG / S-Tronic box. Best of both worlds...
They do in the A5 cab so it's probably not too long before they do in the coupe as well!

I was going to get a 2.0T (180PS) Multitronic but since Audi UK have been on a mission to add new features/options to the A5 on an almost weekly basis I reckon I am going to blow the budget and get the 2.0T (211PS) with Quattro and S Tronic!

After having S Tronic on my A3 I much prefer it to the Multitronic 2.7TDi A5 I test drove.
 

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Anybody that doesn't have experience with driving manual diesels should really try it out before buying due to the shorter shifts... you have to shift a lot more often than you do on gasoline manuals.
 

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Anybody that doesn't have experience with driving manual diesels should really try it out before buying due to the shorter shifts... you have to shift a lot more often than you do on gasoline manuals.
Sorry LOc I don't agree with your generalisation. The V6 3.0Tdi Unit has 500Nm Torque and pulls like a train across a fairly wide rev band, this means less need to change gear unless you want too.

RG:D
 

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Anybody that doesn't have experience with driving manual diesels should really try it out before buying due to the shorter shifts... you have to shift a lot more often than you do on gasoline manuals.
Sorry loc I have to disagree here (and worryingly agree with RG :eek:) as the opposite is true in my experience - torquey diesels require less gear changes than petrol models. I drive quite a few miles in a variety of vehicles (manual and auto) so base this on my actual experiences. Diesels do generally have lower revving engines but this doesn't translate into more gearchanges.
 

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I test drove the 2.7 multi-tronic, having never driven a manual before, and initially it takes a bit of getting used to. But if you spend a lot of time in town driving in traffic then the auto would be the sensible choice from what I experienced.

The main thing that I noticed on the auto was that when stopping at lights you need to keep your foot on the brake, even if there is no incline. I've never liked doing that, preferring to slip out of gear or just depress the clutch - probably just my poor driving style. Not sure if using the Hill Hold means you don't have to hold on the brake when you hit traffic lights?
 

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Sorry loc I have to disagree here (and worryingly agree with RG :eek:)
What's worrying about agreeing with me?:confused::confused: I think my posts are generally about right or if I am proven wrong (IMHO) veryhappy to accept that too.

On matters of personal choice... each to their own... I value that also.;):eek:
 

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Sorry loc I have to disagree here (and worryingly agree with RG :eek:) as the opposite is true in my experience - torquey diesels require less gear changes than petrol models. I drive quite a few miles in a variety of vehicles (manual and auto) so base this on my actual experiences. Diesels do generally have lower revving engines but this doesn't translate into more gearchanges.
In my experience, diesel engines have significantly lower redlines. I cannot attest to the A5 because they aren't available here. However, assume that they too have SIGNIFICANTLY lower redlines, then you would indeed be required to shift more often when doing around the town driving. In my S5, shifting at 4K rpm seems rather casual, although it probably isn't the best for fuel mileage. In the diesel that I own, the engine would probably blow at 3800 rpm.
 

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What's worrying about agreeing with me?:confused::confused:
Just a cheap tongue in cheek joke RG - certainly no offence intended:)

The main thing that I noticed on the auto was that when stopping at lights you need to keep your foot on the brake, even if there is no incline. I've never liked doing that, preferring to slip out of gear or just depress the clutch - probably just my poor driving style. Not sure if using the Hill Hold means you don't have to hold on the brake when you hit traffic lights?
bealios - As you suspected - the Hill Hold does enable you to remove your foot from the brake so you come to a stop, stay in gear but release foot from break and then press the accelerator when you're ready to pull away - effortless :D

In my experience, diesel engines have significantly lower redlines. I cannot attest to the A5 because they aren't available here. However, assume that they too have SIGNIFICANTLY lower redlines, then you would indeed be required to shift more often when doing around the town driving. In my S5, shifting at 4K rpm seems rather casual, although it probably isn't the best for fuel mileage. In the diesel that I own, the engine would probably blow at 3800 rpm.
Hi Ranger - I think you may have missed my point - I agree that diesels have lower revving engines (A5 3.0Tdi is about 4.5k red line which is higher than many) but that does not translate into more frequent gear changes. A petrol engine will rev more freely and therefore gets from 2000 revs to 6000 revs (for example) in the same time that a diesel engine may get from 1700 revs - 4000 revs. In doing so they may well be travelling at the same speed / accellerating at the same rate. As for town driving, because a diesel engine has more torque and can pull well from lower revs it means fewer gear changes. I will try and record useable speed ranges in each gear next time I'm out as I'm not sure how else I can explain.:eek:
 

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Hi Ranger - I think you may have missed my point - I agree that diesels have lower revving engines (A5 3.0Tdi is about 4.5k red line which is higher than many) but that does not translate into more frequent gear changes. A petrol engine will rev more freely and therefore gets from 2000 revs to 6000 revs (for example) in the same time that a diesel engine may get from 1700 revs - 4000 revs. In doing so they may well be travelling at the same speed / accellerating at the same rate. As for town driving, because a diesel engine has more torque and can pull well from lower revs it means fewer gear changes. I will try and record useable speed ranges in each gear next time I'm out as I'm not sure how else I can explain.:eek:
I understand what you are saying about more torque requiring less gear changing, but I think it only applies to situations where you would downshift to gain more power. My comment is regarding acceleration up to a speed. You will indeed have to upshift more with diesel to go the same speed because the RPM's you experience for a given speed boil down to final gearing. I'm pretty sure that the transmissions and axle ratios are the same accross motors in the Audi; however, I would concede the arguement if the final ratios are higher for the diesels.
 

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I'm pretty sure that the transmissions and axle ratios are the same accross motors in the Audi; however, I would concede the arguement if the final ratios are higher for the diesels.
That's settled then!;)
 

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Well, that was quite an unexpected response. In my experience a lot of local 3.0 TDI drivers actually agree with me and many have opted for automatic for exactly this reason. Clearly not so here.

Far be it from me to push my opinion to others, obviously there are different points of view.

I would still recommend trying before buying, though.
 

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My comment is regarding acceleration up to a speed. You will indeed have to upshift more with diesel to go the same speed because the RPM's you experience for a given speed boil down to final gearing.
In my experience, that is EXACTLY the reason why some Audi 3.0 TDI diesel drivers shy away from manuals.

But people here disagree, so I won't argue, just telling what I've heard elsewhere.
 
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