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New member here still learning about my Audi. I have a 2013 Audi A5 2.0t automatic and it's my first turbo car. I recently purchased an ECS atmospheric spacer and an upgraded piersburg diverter valve with the metal piston to replace the stock plastic one which is known to break sooner than later which I have not installed yet. I had an Audi tech tell me that the atmospheric spacers causes boost leaks, is this true? Has Anyone encountered this problem? I've already installed an AWE catback and a Volant cold air intake and now I want the pshhh sound!! Thanks guys and happy new year!
 

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Earlier turbocharging used what are termed "dump" valves because in order to avoid stalling the turbo when the throttle valve closes the air would be released inside the engine bay, resulting in the sound you describe. Newer designs use diverter values which recycle the air through the turbo so that pressure at the manifold is relieved, however the turbo is not retarded and can quickly return to boost, avoiding lag. The ECU takes account of this in fuel metering. Should air be released without it knowing then the least that will happen is that the engine will run rich. If air loss is continuous then since the system uses a pressure-based control loop then there could be a risk that the turbo could overspin, affecting reliability.
 
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Earlier turbocharging used what are termed "dump" valves because in order to avoid stalling the turbo when the throttle valve closes the air would be released inside the engine bay, resulting in the sound you describe. Newer designs use diverter values which recycle the air through the turbo so that pressure at the manifold is relieved, however the turbo is not retarded and can quickly return to boost, avoiding lag. The ECU takes account of this in fuel metering. Should air be released without it knowing then the least that will happen is that the engine will run rich. If air loss is continuous then since the system uses a pressure-based control loop then there could be a risk that the turbo could overspin, affecting reliability.
A simple yes or no would have worked also. Haha just kidding! Thanks for the info, appreciate it!
 

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Dippy is a true genius so you cannot have a yes or no mate hahaha
 
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